A & M Plumbing, LLC
Tuesday, May 23, 2017

How to Save More Green on Your Lawn

Lawn lovers know that keeping it green during the hot summer months requires regular watering. Here are some steps you can take to keep your lawn – and wallet – healthy:

  • Water before 8 a.m. If you water your lawn during midday, you’re may lose as much as 30% of the water to evaporation.
  • Avoid watering on windy day.
  • Water when your lawn is thirsty. Step on the lawn and see if your foot’s indention remains. Footprints are a sign of thirst.
  • Install a rain shut-off device on automatic sprinklers.
  • Water in short sessions. Three ten-minute sessions spaced 30 minutes apart enable better absorption than one 30-minute session.
  • Place your sprinkler so that it waters only the lawn, not the street or sidewalk.
  • Check sprinkler system valves periodically for leaks, and keep the heads in good repair.
  • Don’t use sprinklers that spray a fine mist because the water will evaporate quicker.

Let us know if there’s anything we can do to help you conserve more water!

Retro Is In: Save by Retrofitting Your Plumbing Fixtures

Retrofitting is the process of replacing or modifying old fixtures with ones that save water. Consider these for daily water savings:

Ultra-flush toilets – These use only 1.6 gallons per flush (gpf), compared to 3.5–7 gpf.
Low-flow showerheads – Water flows at a rate of 1.5–2.5 gallons per minute (gpm), while older versions flow 4.5–8 gpm.
Faucet aerators – Aerators mix air and water. Ranging from 0.5–2 gpm, they provide a big savings over newer faucets that use 3.5 gpm and older models that use 7 gpm.

Get the Lead OUT

Your home might have more lead than you think. Lead gets into your water after the water leaves your local treatment plant or well. The source is most likely from inside your home’s plumbing. Corrosion, a reaction between the water and pipes or solder, releases the lead into the water.
 
It is estimated that lead in drinking water contributes 10-20% of total lead exposure in young children.
 
Your local health department or water supplier can answer questions about lead in drinking water. Call us for information about a water filtration system.
 

[CompanyName]'s latest video:


[CouponText]
[CouponDisclaimer]
Click or call now: [Phone]
[CouponText2]
[CouponDisclaimer2]
Click or call now: [Phone]
[CouponText3]
[CouponDisclaimer3]
Click or call now: [Phone]